Ten seasonal foods that may be dangerous for your dog

Dogs love meat scraps, but make sure any scraps you give them are free of bones. Better yet, try rawhide for a tasty treat that when consumed properly, satisfies Fido’s urge to chew and cleans his teeth. Courtesy photo
Dogs love meat scraps, but make sure any scraps you give them are free of bones. Better yet, try rawhide for a tasty treat that when consumed properly, satisfies Fido’s urge to chew and cleans his teeth. Courtesy photo

Rover.com

Special to Valley News

As a pet owner, people know there are foods that dogs shouldn’t eat; chocolate is the most obvious one. But there are a few other human treats that pop up this time of year that are dangerous for dogs. Even if owners don’t feed their dogs scraps from the table, pet owners will want to take extra precautions to keep their pet’s holiday season safe and carefree.

Bones

Making some festive poultry—or even fish? Dogs love meat scraps, but make sure any scraps given to them are free of bones. Dogs can choke on bones, as well as damage their abdominal tract. Make sure to scrape all the bones into a garbage or compost that a dog can’t get into. Giving them some tasty meat scraps is completely fine, as long as it’s fully cooked, and assuming the dog doesn’t have any specific allergies.

Chives, garlic, onions

That’s right, this one means mashed potatoes are off the table, so to speak. Onions, garlic and chives are found in many holiday dishes and can cause blood cell damage and gastrointestinal discomfort. If dog owners don’t want their dog to feel left out of the fun, it is recommended they try plain sweet potatoes, which are packed full of nutrients.

Dough

More specifically, yeast. If a person loves to make fresh bread, take heed—the yeast in bread dough can cause gas and even stomach twisting. Cover dough before walking away and keep it at a paws distance.

Spirits

Never, ever give a dog alcohol. Symptoms of alcohol ingestion include vomiting, diarrhea and difficulty breathing. Do give dogs plenty of fresh water, especially if they’re partaking in more snacks than usual or spending lots of time playing fetch with friends and family.

Dairy

If pet owners ever been around a dog after they’ve eaten a piece of cheese, they probably know the after-effects can be a bit well, stinky. That’s because many dogs are lactose-intolerant. Avoid giving a dog whipped cream and mashed potatoes, but a little bit of plain yogurt can be OK, depending on the dog’s level of tolerance.

Caffeine and chocolate

Caffeine and chocolate contain methylxanthines that cause panting, excessive thirst and urination, vomiting and diarrhea, hyperactivity and abnormal heart rhythm. Keep in mind that the higher cocoa concentration something has, the more toxic it is.

Need a dog sitter for the holidays?

Pet owners who are planning a trip to Miami, Austin, or some other warm destination over the holidays can use Rover.com to find and book a dog sitter who’s right for their dog and budget. Rover has over 65,000 sitters nationwide, and every booking includes premium insurance, a reservation guarantee and 24/7 access to a dedicated team of trust and safety experts.

The information provided in this article is not a substitute for professional veterinary help. For more great tips about pet ownership, visit www.rover.com.

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