Inland Empire Pot Entrepreneur Gets 10 Years

LOS ANGELES – The head of an Inland Empire pot-growing and distribution business was sentenced today to 10 years in federal prison for distributing hundreds of pounds of marijuana.

Aaron Sandusky, 42, of Rancho Cucamonga, founder and owner of G3 Holistic, was convicted at trial in October of conspiring to grow pot, possessing it and distributing it.

Federal prosecutors described Sandusky in Los Angeles federal court documents as ”a money-hungry criminal utterly uninterested in abiding by the rules of ordered society.”

Sandusky’s convictions, combined with the jury’s findings that the offenses involved over 1,000 marijuana plants, subjected him to the mandatory minimum of 120 months imprisonment at the hearing before U.S. District Judge Percy Anderson, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office.

Sandusky’s attorney, Roger Jon Diamond, argued that his client was running a perfectly legal operation under California law. Prosecutors had a different view.

Sandusky — who had pot stores in Moreno Valley, Colton and Upland — ”is an unrepentant manipulator who used the perceived ambiguity surrounding ‘medical’ marijuana to exploit a business opportunity for himself,” prosecutors wrote in sentencing papers.

Sandusky ”built a veneer of legitimacy around his criminal enterprise using his customers’ good-faith search for pain relief. There is absolutely no altruistic component to defendant’s continued and sustained criminality,” prosecutors stated.

According to the sentencing memo, the ”most alarming” aspect of Sandusky’s behavior ”is his total lack of remorse for subjecting his co- defendants to prosecution for working at G3.”

Federal law does not allow any kind of marijuana business and it trumps state laws recognizing it as medicine. In October 2011, prosecutors warned Sandusky in writing.

Sandusky and five associates were later indicted by a federal grand jury, with the U.S. Attorney’s Office alleging they were using California laws that provide for nonprofit groups to grow and distribute pot to people whose doctors have recommended it.

In November 2011, federal agents raided the Upland G3 Holistic store and seized $11,500 in cash.

According to the indictment, G3 Holistic took in $3.3 million during an eight-month period last year. The pot-growing operation was in Ontario.

Sandusky’s older brother, Keith, and the other four indicted pleaded guilty before trial and are awaiting sentencing.


Inland Empire Pot Entrepreneur Faces 10 Years at Sentencing

LOS ANGELES – Prosecutors have recommended that a judge today sentence the head of an Inland Empire pot-growing and distribution business with stores in Moreno Valley, Colton and Upland to at least 10 years in federal prison for drug convictions.

Aaron Sandusky, 42, of Rancho Cucamonga, founder and owner of G3 Holistic, was convicted at trial in October of conspiring to grow pot, possessing it and distributing it.

Federal prosecutors describe Sandusky in Los Angeles federal court documents as ”a money-hungry criminal utterly uninterested in abiding by the rules of ordered society.”

Sandusky’s convictions, combined with the jury’s findings that the offenses involved over 1,000 marijuana plants, subjects him to a mandatory minimum of 120 months imprisonment at today’s hearing before U.S. District Judge Percy Anderson, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office.

Sandusky’s attorney, Roger Jon Diamond, contends that his client was running a perfectly legal operation under California law. Prosecutors, however, see it differently.

Sandusky ”is an unrepentant manipulator who used the perceived ambiguity surrounding ‘medical’ marijuana to exploit a business opportunity for himself,” prosecutors wrote in sentencing papers.

The defendant ”built a veneer of legitimacy around his criminal enterprise using his customers’ good-faith search for pain relief. There is absolutely no altruistic component to defendant’s continued and sustained criminality,” prosecutors stated.

According to the sentencing memo, the ”most alarming” aspect of Sandusky’s behavior ”is his total lack of remorse for subjecting his co- defendants to prosecution for working at G3.”

Federal law does not allow any kind of marijuana business and it trumps state laws recognizing it as medicine. In October 2011, prosecutors warned Sandusky in writing.

Sandusky and five associates were later indicted by a federal grand jury, with the U.S. Attorney’s Office alleging they were using California laws that provide for nonprofit groups to grow and distribute pot to people whose doctors have recommended it.

In November 2011, federal agents raided the Upland G3 Holistic store and seized $11,500 in cash.

According to the indictment, G3 Holistic took in $3.3 million during an eight-month period last year. The pot-growing operation was in Ontario.

Sandusky’s older brother, Keith, and the other four indicted pleaded guilty before trial and are awaiting sentencing.

7 Responses to "Inland Empire Pot Entrepreneur Gets 10 Years"

  1. budgreen   January 7, 2013 at 9:47 am

    Ten (10) years for growing and distributing medical marijuana? Rapists and murderers often get much lesser sentences… The federal government should focus on ten (10)! million undocumented persons residing here!

    Reply
  2. Justanotherperson   January 7, 2013 at 1:24 pm

    Legalize it and and then California would reep the benifits from the taxes on it. Taxes on 3 million from one person in just one year – image the money California could get if they actually legalized and taxed it!

    Reply
  3. Reality Checker   January 8, 2013 at 1:10 pm

    No one that grows is going to running to tell the IRS about thier operation so the gubbmint can tax it. It will go more underground than it already is. It too easy to grow and sell it yourself, why would anyone invest in a market and have the IRS dip thier greedy hands into it? And no one is going to want to start a huge grow with the intention of selling it on an open market as long as people can grow it for themselves so easily. Just my opinion. I wouldnt invest in it, thats for sure.

    Reply
  4. 3J   January 8, 2013 at 7:05 pm

    End Prohibition! Legalize Now! Another casualty in the war on drugs.

    Reply
  5. Justanotherperson   January 9, 2013 at 9:38 am

    I think people would invest in it if they could legally sell it and make money.

    This is no different then the prohibition of alcohol. All those bootleggers either went legit or quit. If it is made legal people are not going to go out of their way to buy it illegally. Some will grow it themselves but most won’t.

    Reply
  6. agree with reality checker   January 11, 2013 at 2:51 am

    Weed is a lot easier to grow at home than it is to make alcohol. There wouldn’t be any tax revenue made because even if each individual user didn’t grow their connects and the drugs from down south would still he tax free. Just now it would be harder to prosecute the ones operating illegally. Takes common sense. Just don’t ask a pothead.

    Reply
  7. Lee Chew   January 11, 2013 at 4:28 pm

    Federal prosecutors, now lets go get the others in downtown Los Angeles. Send a message and stick to it.

    Reply

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