PATRICK WHITTLE Associated Press SAVANNAH, Ga. (AP) — From the surface, these 22 square miles of water are unexceptional. But dip beneath the surface — go down 60 or 70 feet — and you'll find a spectacular seascape. Sponges, barnacles and tube worms cover rocky ledges on the ocean floor, forming a "live bottom." Gray's Reef is little more than a drop in the ocean 19 miles off the Georgia coast, but don't confuse size for significance. In one of his last official acts, President Jimmy Carter declared the reef a national marine sanctuary at the urging of conservationists who said its abundance of life was unique and worth saving for future generations. For nearly 40 years, the U.S. government has protected the reef, home to more than 200 species of fish and an amazing array of ne
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