Hera Hub offers coworking space in Temecula for those tired of working from home

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Besides individual offices, Hera Hub Temecula offers another large space with rows of tables, a mail and printer room, a second lounge, a smaller conference room and a second coffee bar. Valley News/Lexington Howe photo

Clients can settle in and listen to the sound of water faintly cascading down tiered fountains at Hera Hub Temecula, a coworking space with a spa-inspired atmosphere.

Alisha Wilkins, who has a doctorate in organizational psychology, said she knew about the remote coworking model as a result of her research and thought it would be a good idea to create one in the Temecula area.

“Our model is probably a little different from some other coworking spaces, in that a majority of our space is coworking because what we really want to evoke is a community,” Wilkins said.

Alisha Wilkins, Ph.D., owns Hera Hub Temecula, a coworking space that cultivates community. Valley News/Lexington Howe photo

The Temecula office is the eighth Hera Hub location, and all are individually owned. Collectively, Hera Hub has around 500 members globally, with locations in the U.S. to Sweden. Hera Hub is the first female-focused coworking space to go international.

The facility, located at 41765 Rider Way, has three conference rooms, available to members or the public if they choose to rent out the space.

Their large conference room, which is called the “Kubwa” or “large” in Swahili, sits between 12-14 people and offers a Smart TV, glass whiteboards and a buffet table.

Their medium-sized conference room sits between six and eight people and offers a glass whiteboard and a rolling Smart TV, which can be moved to other locations in the space if needed.

Hera Hub Temecula also offers a kitchen, with a refrigerator, dishwasher, microwave and sink. There’s also coffee and tea available or spa water.

“We also serve our guests out of glasses, that just kind of goes with the aesthetics of what we do,” Wilkins said.

The space has two restrooms, one female and the other multigender.

Besides individual offices, Hera Hub Temecula offers another large space with rows of tables, a mail and printer room, a second lounge, a smaller conference room and a second coffee bar. Valley News/Lexington Howe photo

The larger coworking space has several bistro tables, counter-height tables and several rows of tables for members. There is also a second coffee bar and several bounce balls throughout the space and an outdoor seating area. The bistro area tables are specifically designed for those who wish to stand while they work. Across from the bistro tables is the printer and mail room.

“Our members can actually utilize this address as their business address which is great,” Wilkins said. “This really professionalizes and legitimizes individuals’ businesses by being able to use our address as their physical address, on their website, on different internet platforms or business cards if they so choose too.”

The smallest conference room can accommodate two to four people, with a settee in the back of the room for counseling and such. Next door is a quiet room that offers members extra focus and quiet and a second lounge with several couches.

Hera Hub Temecula set up online features for members to create community.

Hera Hub Temecula provides a separate room, if a client needs to film podcasts, vlogs, or online content or audio. Valley News/Lexington Howe photo

“We are also a business accelerator,” Wilkins said. “So, we provide women with access to resources because our intent is to get them in here and help them to grow their businesses. We’re going to bring you in here, get you all the things that you need for your business to grow strong and healthy and then for you to be able to truly launch.”

Much of their online content operates through their private Facebook page for members.

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, Hera Hub Temecula began offering virtual coworking sessions, where members can check in with each other and discuss goals. During a two-hour timeframe, they can check in every 25 minutes or so to see where everyone is with those goals.

“It’s really a lot of accountability, and that’s what you find at Hera Hub, is your sisters that are really holding each other accountable,” Wilkins said.

Another online aspect, the office provides is a weekly writer’s lounge. People can receive help with their writing content, update their bio and much more.

“Prior to COVID-19, we would meet all those who wanted to participate with me in the large conference room, but right now because of COVID-19 we have access virtually,” Wilkins said.

Professional writers often attend and help people individually.

Wilkins said the weekly business boosters is another feature designed to help members gain knowledge on topic areas they might not be as familiar with and receive help. Since the coronavirus pandemic, they’ve also implemented a weekly 30-minute Monday meditation.

Since the governor ordered nonessential businesses to close in March, there have been some challenges, Wilkins said.

Besides individual offices, Hera Hub Temecula offers another large space with rows of tables, a mail and printer room, a second lounge, a smaller conference room and a second coffee bar. Valley News/Lexington Howe photo

“I opened back up mid-May when the governor indicated that certain businesses can open back up as long as they have different procedures in place, and we do,” Wilkins said. “We wear masks when we’re walking around in the place; once you get to your specific location, whether it’s an office or a conference room or wherever, you can remove your mask.

“Wherever you do decide to locate for the day, there is a requirement that you wipe it down,” she said. “There’s disinfectant to be able to wipe it down; we certainly probably have more hand sanitizer throughout the space than we’ve ever had before.

“My main objective is that we continue to make sure that our members and any of our visitors continue to be safe,” she said.

Wilkins and her family have lived in the Temecula area for the past 17 years.

Wilkin’s husband is retired military, and their son graduated from Linfield Christian High School. They’ve seen a lot of growth in the area, Wilkins said.

“This city has been a blessing for my family and I,” Wilkins said. “I love the quaintness of it, but I also love the fact that it’s growing. It’s changing, and I want to continue to make sure it’s a place where other people can raise their kids. A place where our seniors can actually live and survive.”

Ginger Hitzke, one of the founding members of Hera Hub and owner of Hitzke Development Corporation, is a developer who builds affordable housing and uses one of the offices at the Hera Hub space.

“My work is in San Diego County, and I have an office in Lemon Grove. It’s convenient down there because of all the meetings I would normally have in-person, but not having any in-person meetings, I’m not driving down there,” Hitzke said. “I needed to get out of my house, and so this is an amazing resource that we have here.”

For more information on pricing, guest passes, conference room bookings or offices available at Hera Hub Temecula, visit https://herahub.com/temecula.

Lexington Howe can be reached by email at lhowe@reedermedia.com.

Hera Hub Temecula has four office spaces/rooms available to rent, although two are currently in use. When renting the space, clients can choose to utilize the room as is or bring in their own furniture. Valley News/Lexington Howe photo
Besides individual offices, Hera Hub Temecula offers another large space with rows of tables, a mail and printer room, a second lounge, a smaller conference room and a second coffee bar. Valley News/Lexington Howe photo
Hera Hub Temecula has four office spaces/rooms available to rent, although two are currently in use. When renting the space, clients can choose to utilize the room as is or bring in their own furniture. Valley News/Lexington Howe photo
Hera Hub Temecula has four office spaces/rooms available to rent, although two are currently in use. When renting the space, clients can choose to utilize the room as is or bring in their own furniture. Valley News/Lexington Howe photo