Temecula Valley Hospital offers a one-day breast cancer procedure with Xoft intraoperative radiation therapy

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Physicist Luke Chan of Xoft Inc. demonstrates how a breast intraoperative radiation therapy machine functions to radiate tissue after a lumpectomy to Temecula Valley Hospital health care workers who will be using the new machine. The machine radiates tissue around the site where the tumor was immediately removed in the operating room. Intraoperative radiation therapy gives the patient more quality of life as it reduces the need for frequent radiation treatments, fewer side effects and reduced costs. Temecula Valley Hospital will be providing this new procedure to patients with early stage breast cancer who qualify. Valley News/Shane Gibson photo

TEMECULA – Temecula Valley Hospital now offers intraoperative radiation therapy for select patients with early-stage breast cancer.

Breast intraoperative radiation therapy with iCAD’s Xoft Axxent Electronic Brachytherapy System provides clinicians with the option to perform radiation therapy in the operating room at the time of surgery. By delivering a complete, concentrated dose of radiation at the time of lumpectomy, this treatment offers select patients an innovative alternative to traditional external beam radiation therapy with valuable benefits for patients including shorter treatment times, fewer side effects, reduced costs, added convenience and improved quality of life.

Radiation oncologist Dr. Tara Washington (left) and breast surgeon Dr. Amy Bremner next to the Xoft IORT machine in a Temecula Valley Hospital operating room before performing the hospital’s first IORT treatment. Valley News/Shane Gibson photo

“Research shows that breast cancer is the most common cancer among American women and that one in eight women in the United States will be diagnosed with breast cancer in her lifetime,” Darlene Wetton, CEO of Temecula Valley Hospital, said. “Now, more than ever, IORT is a very important option for the women in our community and we are proud to offer this innovative treatment.”

IORT with the Xoft system utilizes a miniaturized, isotope-free X-ray source to deliver a full course of targeted radiation from inside the body, directly within the tumor cavity where the cancer is most likely to recur, carefully destroying cancer cells and reducing the risk of damage to nearby healthy tissue including the heart, lungs and ribs. Traditional EBRT involves daily radiation treatments for two to 10 weeks, while IORT with the Xoft System can be completed in as little as 10 minutes. Patients appreciate that breast IORT decreases potential side effects which are more common with whole-breast irradiation and enables them to more quickly return to normal activities with minimal downtime. IORT may be delivered as a single fraction or boost at lumpectomy for early-stage breast cancer. The Xoft system is FDA-cleared for the treatment of cancer anywhere in the body, including early-stage breast cancer, non-melanoma skin cancer and gynecological cancers. Visit https://www.xoftinc.com/documents/XoftSystemIORTFactSheet.pdf for more information.

Physicist Maung Yoe-Sein prepares Temecula Valley Hospital’s new intraoperative radiation therapy machine in the operating room before a lumpectomy. Valley News/Shane Gibson photo

Temecula Valley Hospital is now accepting referral patients for breast intraoperative radiation therapy. The physicians performing these procedures are breast surgeon Dr. Amy Bremner and radiation oncologist Dr. Tara Washington – both of City of Hope, a world-renowned independent research and treatment center for cancer, diabetes and other life-threatening diseases with 30 locations in Southern California. For more information, visit https://www.temeculavalleyhospital.com.

Temecula Valley Hospital, with a 5 Star Medicare Hospital Compare rating, brings advanced technology, innovative programs, patient-centered and family sensitive care to area residents featuring 140 private patient rooms. Temecula Valley Hospital is the first Universal Health Services Hospital Emergency Department in the country to achieve accreditation from the American College of Emergency Physicians as a geriatric emergency department. The hospital specializes in advanced cardiac services, stroke care, general and surgical specialties and orthopedics as a recent Blue Distinction Center Designation for quality in knee and hip replacement surgeries. Temecula Valley Hospital is nationally recognized for patient safety by the Leapfrog Group, with a 2017 Top Hospital Award and patients’ consecutive “A” grades for patient safety in spring 2019, fall 2018, spring 2018, fall 2017, spring 2017 and fall 2016.

Physicist Maung Yoe-Sein prepares a catheter connected to the intraoperative radiation therapy machine in the operating room before a lumpectomy at Temecula Valley Hospital. Valley News/Shane Gibson

Xoft’s transformative vision for the future of radiation therapy began with the breakthrough development of the miniaturized X-ray source – so small, it could fit on the tip of a finger. Today, this proprietary technology, combined with the comprehensive capabilities of the Xoft system, has powered the treatment of thousands of cancer patients worldwide.

Every component of the advanced platform technology has been expertly engineered to improve quality of care, optimize operational workflow and increase access to patient-centric, cutting-edge radiation therapy for patients and providers alike – all in one, innovative system.

The technology empowers physicians with full confidence to precisely and effectively treat cancer and enable their patients to live healthy, high-quality lives. Their commitment to this innovative technology is driven by the valuable benefits it offers to physicians, facilities and patients on a global scale.  For more information, visit https://www.xoftinc.com.

Submitted by Temecula Valley Hospital.

Xoft surgical applications specialist Bill Epperly, right, provides further information about the intraoperative radiation therapy process shortly before the radiation procedure to breast surgeon Dr. Amy Bremner, center, and radiation oncologist Dr. Tara Washington, both members of City of Hope. Valley News/Shane Gibson photo
Temecula Valley Hospital certified surgery technicians Ryan Hutchings and Andrea Jessup prepare for a lumpectomy and intraoperative radiation therapy treatment during the hospital’s first time performing the radiation treatment for early stage breast cancer patients. Valley News/Shane Gibson photo
Temecula Valley Hospital certified surgery technician Andrea Jessup sizes a balloon that will be placed into the cavity where a breast tumor was removed. The balloon is filled with a precise amount of saline, placed in the empty cavity and the tissue surrounding the balloon where the tumor was is radiated. Valley News/Shane Gibson photo
Xoft surgical applications specialist Bill Epperly watches as Temecula Valley Hospital medical staff perform their first intraoperative radiation therapy procedure on a patient with early stage breast cancer. Epperly travels to hospitals that perform the new IORT treatment using the Xoft machine to help educate them on how to use the machine.
Temecula Valley Hospital surgery staff prepare to perform the new intraoperative radiation therapy procedure on an early stage breast cancer patient. Valley News/Shane Gibson photo
Temecula Valley Hospital certified surgery technician Andrea Jessup views the balloon filled with saline that will be placed in the cavity where a breast cancer tumor was to radiate the cancerous tissue directly and reduce the risk of radiating healthy tissue. Valley News/Shane Gibson photo
Radiation oncologist Dr. Tara Washington, left, and Xoft surgical applications specialist Bill Epperly view an ultrasound showing the placement and position of the balloon inside the cavity where a breast tumor was removed during the hospital’s first intraoperative radiation therapy procedure. Valley News/Shane Gibson photo
With the intraoperative radiation therapy balloon in position, breast surgeon Dr. Amy Bremner will step away from the sterile field where the radiation oncologist and physicist step in to conduct the IORT treatment. Valley News/Shane Gibson photo
The balloon in position and catheter will be connected to the Xoft intraoperative radiation therapy machine where radiation will be sent for as little as 10 minutes. Valley News/Shane Gibson photo
Physicist Maung Yoe-Sein prepares the intraoperative radiation therapy machine for its prescribed dose of radiation for a patient with early stage breast cancer at Temecula Valley Hospital. Valley News/Shane Gibson photo
Physicist Maung Yoe-Sein and radiation oncologist Dr. Tara Washington prepare to perform the intraoperative radiation therapy treatment for the first time at Temecula Valley Hospital. Valley News/Shane Gibson photo
Xoft physicist Luke Chan and Xoft surgical applications specialist Bill Epperly move shields to protect operating room staff from radiation once the intraoperative radiation therapy treatment begins on a patient with early stage breast cancer. Valley News/Shane Gibson photo
From left, physicist Mung Yoe-Sein, radiation oncologist Dr. Tara Washington and Xoft physicist Luke Chan begin the new breast cancer radiation treatment at Temecula Valley Hospital. Valley News/Shane Gibson photo

 

Radiation oncologist Dr. Tara Washington begins the process of removing the balloon from the patient’s breast after an intraoperative radiation therapy treatment. The procedure that consists of removing the tumor, placing balloon applicator into the cavity, radiating cancerous tissue for as little as 10 minutes before the balloon is removed and the cavity is closed greatly reduces the need for multiple radiation treatments for patients who have early stage breast cancer. Valley News/Shane Gibson photo
After the IORT treatment is complete, Temecula Valley Hospital operating staff step back into the operating room to begin the process of removing the balloon and catheter from the breast. Valley News/Shane Gibson photo