People and homes vanish due to 2020 census’ new privacy method

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This Friday, Oct. 22, photo shows a neighborhood in Milwaukee that is one of many places in the country where a new method used by the U.S. Census Bureau to protect confidentiality in the 2020 census has made people and occupied homes vanish, at least on paper, when they actually exist in the real world. (AP Photo/Morry Gash)
Mike Schneider The Associated Press The three-bedroom colonial-style house where Jessica Stephenson has lived in Milwaukee for the last six years bustles with activity on any given weekday, filled with the chattering of children in the day care center she runs out of her home. The U.S. Census Bureau says no one lives there. “They should come and see it for themselves,” Stephenson said. From her majority-Black neighborhood in Wisconsin to a community of Hasidic Jews in New York’s Catskill Mountains to a park outside Tampa, Florida, a method used by the census bureau for the first time to protect confidentiality in the 2020 census has made people and occupied homes vanish, at least on paper, when they actually exist in the real world. It’s not a magic trick but rath
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