UCR gets $150,000 grant for excavation at Ancient City in Central Mexico

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Teotihuacan, which was designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1987, is characterized by the vast size of its monuments, particularly the Temple of Quetzalcoatl and the Pyramids of the Sun and the Moon. Wikimedia
RIVERSIDE - The National Endowment for the Humanities today announced $24 million in grants for 225 humanities projects across the country, including nearly $150,000 to UC Riverside to conduct an excavation and survey to detail the presence and influence of Maya residents at the ancient city of Teotihuacan in central Mexico. Teotihuacan, which was designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1987, is characterized by the vast size of its monuments, particularly the Temple of Quetzalcoatl and the Pyramids of the Sun and the Moon. Located about 30 miles northeast of modern-day Mexico City, it was settled as early as 400 B.C. and was the most influential city in the region by 400 A.D. By the time the Aztecs discovered it in the 1400s and named it Teotihuacan, meaning "the place where the gods
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